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Outdoor Holiday Gifts For Everyone!

Do you have a homeowner on your gift list this holiday season?

There are so many great options that combine the practical with the just plain awesome and everything on this list is available at Toemar.

Some of these may not fit under the tree, but they will certainly get a great, big smile!

The Landscaper

Being a professional landscaper is hard work. A gift that could make some of the hauling and dumping of rocks, dirt, gravel, and sand a whole lot easier? That’s an easy one! Get your favourite landscaper a Muck Truck!

These power wheelbarrows are so much more than the traditional, manual version.

While they may look like an adult version of a Tonka truck (!), Muck Trucks sport a 5.5hp Honda engine, four wheel drive transmission and big knotted wheels to go over any terrain, even stairs! They can carry up to 800 lbs in one load, which is the about the equivalent of 2.5 standard wheelbarrows.

There’s no question that the landscaper in your life, or even the serious gardener, could get a lot more done with a lot less wear and tear on their back, with the Muck Truck. And that fact they look cool and are super-fun goes without saying…

The Gardener

If the gardener on your list isn’t in the market for a Muck Truck, consider getting them set up for spring with deliveries of all the goodies they’re going to need to get their garden into the best shape it’s ever been. Like what?

How about booking a delivery of a Garden Bag? You can get topsoil, overseeding soil, mulch, gravel, screening or sand for any gardening project, delivered right to them. Do they need river rocks, potato stones, or red brick to finish off the look of their yard? You can get those too!

Toemar offers free delivery on all Garden Bag products within Mississauga’s city limits.

Another idea is to add some landscape fabric, to help them put together a new weed free space and perhaps a few Blue Mountain Rock boulders to enhance their plans for a leveled garden?

They’ll be knee deep in making their design plans all winter long and will thank you again in the spring!

The Chef

If your favourite chef has a great outdoor space—and what chef worth their salt doesn’t—the perfect accessory to complete the package would be a wood burning outdoor pizza oven.

With easy to install blocks for the base and a pre-assembled oven unit, the Forno Antico® Pizza Oven will be the chef’s best gift! It only takes 15 minutes to heat it up and cook up to two gorgeous artisanal pizzas. Who wouldn’t love that?

Make sure you give them some great recipes to go with it, and a load of firewood, so they can get started with the baking of pizza pies right away!

And by the way, outdoor pizza ovens CAN be used in winter! Just make sure to add extra time to getting it warmed up and add extra wood to keep the temperature nice and hot despite winter winds 😊

The Zen Yogi

When you think zen, do you think about the sound of water? Not a full-on waterfall, but the delicate tinkling sound of gently running water? You can bet that your zen yoga enthusiast thinks that too!

If they enjoy doing their yoga routine outside in good weather, make the space they use even more soothing and calm by adding an outdoor water feature.

Whether you opt for a pond or a stream, a small waterfall or fountain, this gift is a beautiful addition to the garden, and makes a fantastic Christmas gift.

Give your zen seeker everything they’ll need to install it or plan for some professional help in the spring, and they’ll be on their way to a more zen downward dog in no time. Namaste!

The DIYer

We all know a home and garden DIYer. They want to plan, purchase, and install everything in and out of their homes themselves and more power to them!

They can save a lot of money and have things exactly as they want them, while also having the satisfaction of getting it done themselves.

It’s all a lot easier, however, with the right gardening and landscaping tools. Whether that’s a job lot of basics, like pruners, shovels and rakes, or into the more specific, like lawn rollers, chisels and tampers, getting them the tools that make the job easier and help them get it right the first time, is the gift that keeps on giving.

From knee pads to wheelbarrows, there’s always something a gardener needs, and the best part? Most of these items (wheelbarrow excluded) will actually fit under your Toemar-bought Christmas tree!

The Hygge Obsessed

Hygge. That famous Danish word that means coziness. People who embrace hygge can enjoy the long months of winter and cold by doubling down on the blankets, pillows and hot drinks by the fire.

So make that last bit a whole lot easier for the hygge inspired family member by getting them a cord of perfectly seasoned and dry firewood, delivered in Mississauga and beyond.

Better yet, offer to stack it for them for maximum protection of the wood and you’ll be their hero every time the snow and wind is howling.

Anyone who doesn’t think that firewood is a romantic and useful gift, has never known the satisfaction of a cup of coffee laced with Baileys before a warm fire on Christmas Eve!

The Whole Family

Have you ever seen National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation? You know the scene where Clark W. Griswold skips the Christmas tree lot and opts to trudge with his family through the woods to find the perfect tree? If you’ve seen it, you know how it ends (wince)

Don’t be a Griswold!

Starting in mid-November, drop by Toemar to check out the range of fresh cut Fraser and Balsam firs available, in sizes from 5 to 15 feet.

These trees come squirrel free and will keep their needles in good shape throughout the holiday. A gorgeous tree is just the icing on the cake when it comes to having a great Christmas and holiday season.

Now that you’ve got all the gifts planned for the special people on your list, what about you? Will you get yourself something? Plan your garden for the spring and start your list now!

 

 

 

Shhh: An Easy Secret To A Lush Beautiful Garden – Mulch

This secret garden ingredient will transform your lawn and garden from burnt to bountiful

A dry autumn with burnt leaves, as Mississauga experienced last year, results in drought like conditions for your garden, lawn and trees, come the following spring. So what’s a gardener to do? Mulch.

What Is Mulch?

At a most basic definition, mulch is a material that you spread over your lawn and garden to protect it from the elements.

Mulch comes in a variety of formats. Some people use their fallen leaves in the autumn, but if you want to mulch year round, in garden beds for example, you can get bark mulch, as well as mulch made from recycled wood, in different colours (red, brown and black) to suit your landscaping design. In the case of the brown mulch, it is made up of natural pine and cedar so it not only has a beautiful colour, but also a heady aroma that gardeners favour!

What Is Mulch Used For?

Mulch has a variety of important uses. It works to keep moisture and nutrients in the soil while at the same time minimizing soil erosion and preventing weeds from growing. It also breaks down over time, enriching the soil. Think of it like the layer of leaves that protect a forest floor in the wild, except your garden has a little help from you (and your local garden centre)!

The weed prevention aspect is an important one for gardeners as a little mulch can go a long way to saving your back from endless weed pulling. There’s a reason you see it in garden beds on city / municipal property. It’s good for the garden but it also saves a lot of money in toil, weeding and maintaining the beds.

In the fall, a solid layer of mulch is a blanket between your garden and the cold and snow. Roots of plants, trees and shrubbery are better protected against the elements, by maintaining a more consistent, moderate temperature below ground. Come spring, it will also prevent soil erosion from heavy rain showers and run offs.

But if it is a barrier, isn’t it preventing moisture from penetrating? The bigger issue with moisture protection is evaporation and dew is the biggest culprit. Dew is mostly created by the condensation of the moisture in the soil, as opposed to the moisture in the air being deposited on the ground. So a barrier of mulch helps to prevent dew from the soil from forming and ultimately evaporating.

If you’re looking to grow plants like tomatoes, compost is indispensable, but so is mulch. Tomatoes are prone to soil-borne diseases and mulching your plants at the right time ensures that the soil won’t splash up onto the plants, during a rainstorm, for example.

What Is The Difference Between All The Types Of Mulch?

People use all sorts of things to mulch their gardens: straw, grass clippings, compost, wood chips, sawdust and so on. There are merits to all of them, and some downsides to many. Straw, for example, can attract vermin and may also contain some weed seeds, which really would defeat the purpose of using it in your garden. Grass clippings are useful to mix in with mulch if they’re green because while in that stage, they contain plenty of nitrogen and other nutrients. As the grass breaks down in the soil, those nutrients will be released and be good for your beds. Wood chips and shredded bark are the ideal forms of mulch, as they don’t come with the downsides of some of the others and are not only functional but add a lot of beauty to a gardenscape.

When Should You Apply Mulch To Your Garden?

You can mulch anytime of year: many people do it to beautify their garden beds in the spring and summer, as well as to minimize weed infestations. It creates a colour infusion or a lovely base for your grasses and flowers and will enhance everything from garden beds to pool decks.

The critical time of year to mulch that you should not miss however is in the fall, where the materials provide a blanket for your garden, to safeguard it through the winter months and help the ground retain the moisture it will need to be lush and full in the spring.

Whether spring or fall, just pile the mulch at the base of trees, plants and shrubs and if you’re covering a wider area, like a garden bed, make sure that you add a substantial enough layer—two to four inches ought to do the trick—to be effective in both moisture retention and weed prevention.

Where to buy your mulch in Mississauga

The good news is that mulch is one of our biggest spring sellers so we keep tons in stock. Come by the store to place your order, or order from www.gardenbag.ca and we’ll deliver it to you along with your soil.

If you need advice on mulching, composting or other gardening and landscaping needs, let us know! We’re happy to answer questions and remember that you needn’t cart your mulch home with you in the back seat: we deliver!

The Awesome Planting Guide For Your Plants – Knowing When

We’ve got the research and experience to give you this awesome planting guide to know when to plant for people living in Mississauga.

Read on to find out how you can get the best and (probably) the most productive garden on your block!

Timelines for gardening: three seasons dates and deadlines for Mississauga zone.

January is the time of year for planning: resolutions, good will, ideas and preparations for the year ahead. There is no more obvious place to lay the groundwork for the year than in your garden.

Do You Know Your Zone?

Before you can start planning your planning, you have to know your hardiness zone. This was originally an American system to categorize plants, shrubs and trees by temperature zone. Basically, the lower the number, the colder the weather in the zone. Picking plants that are meant for an 8 zone, when you live in a 6, will likely leave you with a dead plant.

For Mississauga, we are currently a 6a (there is also a 6b, in case you were wondering). 6a is a little colder than 6b but when you are picking most plants, you will simply pick by hardiness zone 6. You can choose from among hardier plants (5,4,3…) as well. We say ‘currently’ because global warming is having an effect on the hardiness zones. There are sources that say that Mississauga is now a 6b but for the gardener planning their next year’s garden, the number you need to remember is 6.

Know Your Frost Free Date

This is an ever changing target but in the GTA, you can reliably look to around Mother’s Day—in the area of May 9th— for the frost free date. This means that it is unlikely that we will experience severe frost after that date, making it relatively safe to start your planting. That said, it’s still best to leave less hardy plants and flowers—tomato plants, for example— for another month, if you can. Check your day and night forecasts from Environment Canada before you plant and remember that planting works best when the soil has had a chance to warm and dry up a little from the winter run off.

Highway 401 is a good demarcation point to use when considering your frost free dates. Above the 401? Wait an extra week or two after Mother’s Day. Proximity to the lake and to the general heat created in an urban setting like downtown Toronto affects the likelihood of late frost occurring.

January / February Planning

If you’re going to make changes to your garden this season, now is the time to plan them. Are you planning to add a water feature? You should get in touch with your local hardscaper to be sure that your plans are accurate, or to book them in for the Spring. Or maybe you’re going for a few more modest changes: just a couple of raised beds of perennials, perhaps? Are you planning a vegetable garden? Do your research now on plants and vegetables that are adaptable to your zone and check the dates for sowing / planting to get optimal return for the season, so you’re not scrambling later. Also, start checking out the seed catalogues and get your orders in, if you enjoy growing your garden plants from seeds.

March Planning And Action

By the middle of March, you should be starting to sow seeds indoors, if you really want to get a jump start on the season. Annuals like impatiens or vegetables such as peppers can be started indoors. Later in March, you can start sowing things like parsley, petunias and other more delicate florals.

April Planning And Action

If you’re into sowing seeds to prepare for Spring planting, this is the month when you really need to get it in gear!

  • Early to mid-April — tomatoes, onion, lettuce all should be sowed now.
  • Mid to end of April — cucumbers, herbs, cabbage and annuals such as morning glories and marigolds.

Once the daytime temperature is consistently above freezing, you can start preparing your beds:

  • Rake off winter debris of old leaves and clear twigs, branches or other materials.
  • Add compost and manure.
  • If you haven’t started already, now is a good time to start composting. You’ll have a good base with the old leaves you raked off.
  • Rake your lawn to get up the old, dead grass.

Late in the month of April and IF there has been no further frost, you CAN start to plant hardier items like peas, turnips, onions, radishes, and pansies. Just remember that a late, hard frost is always possible, right into the middle of May.

May Planning And Action

Once the threat of frost is well and truly over, you can start planting out some of the plants you were sowing indoors. If you prefer not to grow from seeds, you can start visiting your local garden centre and picking out the plants—annual and perennial—that you had planned for your beds. You may still want to have covers handy (old bed sheets or row covers): in case of a sudden frost, just pop them over your new transplants to keep the frost at bay.

June / July / August

Enjoy your garden! Summer is fleeting so spend time in your garden and if you want to do any autumn planting, check out our previous post on the subject! It will help you to plan what will work and what won’t, as well as give you a list of things you can do to start preparing your garden for winter.

Lawn care at this point is a lot about maintenance but you can also start planning for the winter by doing some overseeding / sodding where it’s needed.

September / October Planning and Action

Now is the time to start getting your lawn and garden ready for winter and the first frost, which can be as early as the first days in October. You don’t want to be caught short and have all that hard work go to waste! Also, there is a lot you can do to prepare your lawn and garden for next year’s planting, to ensure that you get a maximum return on your green thumb efforts!

It’s a great time of year to check in with your local landscaper / hardscaper to make sure that your projects are ready to start work when the ground thaws or give us a call for some friendly landscaping advice.

Autumn Gardening – 5 Awesome Tips for Planting in the Fall

While the evenings are cooler, the days are still warm, making autumn gardening a perfect time to start your winter preparations.

Traditionally Spring is seen as the optimal season for planting, but that’s really a fallacy.

Thanks to the summer warmed soil and more frequent rainfall of early fall, autumn gardening is far better for perennials and many trees and shrubs. Why? It’s easier for them to form roots with a more temperate and evenly moisturized soil.

Spring planting often leaves plants struggling for their first season as they are planted in cold soil, making rooting more difficult, while at the same time the new plants are dealing with fast growing foliage thanks to the warm air that surrounds them.

So, with that in mind, let’s take a closer look at some plants and trees that you can plant when doing autumn gardening, to enjoy right away and into next season as well:

  • Hostas
  • Daisies
  • Daylilies
  • Peonies
  • Maple, spruce and pine trees—if they’re very small, don’t forget to stake them to avoid damage from the stronger fall winds.
  • Don’t forget your bulbs, like tulips, daffodils and garlic!

TIP! Fall planting is most successful if you continue watering, so that roots can develop adequately and the still warm soil will be fully moisturized, prior to the first frost. Make sure to use mulch, which will help to retain the moisture and warmth in the soil and add much needed nutrients for the rooting process that will take place over the winter.

What About Planting Seeds?

Nature knows what she is doing: seeds blow around in the autumn, end up in the soil and germinate in the spring. There are certain seeds that do very well by being planted in the fall:

  • Sweet peas
  • Pansies
  • Snapdragons… to name but a few!

Get Your Garden and Soil Ready For Winter

Late August/September is the perfect time to take care preliminary garden tasks like:

  • Adding compost to your gardens or vegetable beds, readying the soil for spring planting.
  • Covering your water features with nets to keep them leaf-free.
  • Pulling weeds—these will go to seed in the fall and you’ll have that much more to pull in the spring if you don’t do it now!
  • Adding fertilizer to your lawn.
  • Continuing to water your plants—as we noted earlier—to make sure they are hydrated right up to the first freeze.
  • Trimming back any diseased foliage to avoid a new outbreak next year. Do NOT compost the diseased clippings!
  • Pruning perennials that are now dormant—gone yellow/brown in the stems and leaves.

Sod Or Overseed Your Lawn In The Fall

Cooler air in September onwards means less evaporation and limited growth of grass stems, so the grass seeds or sod have ample time to develop a strong root structure. Next summer? Your lawn will be the envy of the neighbourhood.

Consider using a high quality weed free overseeding soil—which contain organic compost—if you are going with seeds, to ensure that there are adequate nutrients available.

Don’t Forget Your Herbs

This is a perfect time to collect all the remaining herbs in your garden to dry them out for use throughout the winter. If you’re bringing some inside for the season, September is the perfect time, before the temperature fluctuations start to damage the plants.

Remember, clay pots, in particular, don’t do well as temperatures begin to cool more – they crack in the cold.

Once the temperatures start to really dip in October, it’s time to bring them inside for the season. Even if you have plastic pots, our advice is to store them in the garage at the very least so they don’t become bleached and weathered and last a year or two longer.

The average Southern Ontario September is mild and enjoyable with cooler evenings and no mosquitoes! So get outside, start autumn gardening and enjoy the fruits of your labour now and next season. Be sure to let us know if you have any questions about fall gardening.

Soil Preparation for Planting

As our spring days become warmer and warmer, now is the time to think about soil preparation for your garden. So before you get out there and start shoveling or tilling the soil consider the following when you should start “working” the soil.

Too Early

Clumps. That is what happens when you start to work the soil too early. When the ground is still saturated with water from melting snow or spring rain, turning the soil over will give clumps that will be difficult to break down at a later time. Wet soil doesn’t break up into loose and fine particles of dirt that create miniscule air pockets perfect for plant roots to grow in.

Dried Yet?

You can get a moisture reader which is expensive, but the surefire way is a much simpler and you’ll know whether or not the soil has dried out enough to be worked on. Grab a handful of soil (the size of a baseball) and squeeze the soil together until it forms a ball. If the dirt can be crumbled by pressing your fingers together or dropping it from table height, then you’ve got soil that is dry enough to start digging. If the ball of dirt maintains it shape or breaks into solid sections rather than loose soil, there is still too much water in the dirt.

Mississauga Soil

Approximately 60% of Mississauga’s soil being clay, here are some pointers that will help you understand the soil in your yard:

  • Heavy clay soil – At 75% to 100% moisture, the clay soil is too wet, it is dark in color and feels slick when rubbed between thumb and forefinger. The soil will be completely pliable and you can draw with it. A ball will form moisture content is less than 50%.
  • Coarse clay soil – This soil is more of a sandy loam or silt loam. At 50% moisture, you can probably form a ball and will tend to crumble. At 75% to 100% moisture it will be similar to a heavy clay soil.
  • Coarse sandy soil – A ball will not form at less than 50% moisture. At 75% to 100% moisture, a weak ball can be form but shatter easily.

The “RIGHT” soil

Having the right soil can greatly affect the quality of your plants. Soil composition should be balanced, well-drained, fertile and with a pH (acidity level) between 6 and 7.  If the soil is too acidic, add some lime. If you have sandy soil where there is not enough organic matter OR if you have clay soil which is too heavy and compact, you need to add decomposed manure or compost to help improve soil structure and composition while providing the nutrients required by the plants.

Image sources:https://www.flickr.com/photos/scrap_pile/